Announcing the Documenting Hope Project

14 children, 18 months, 1 goal:  RECOVERY The Documenting Hope Project is a documentary brought to you by Epidemic Answers.  In this film, we will be documenting the potential recovery of 14 children from autism, ADHD, asthma, atopic dermatitis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, mood disorders and type 2 diabetes as they work with integrative health practitioners for 18 months. These children will be receiving free medical services, healthy food and supplements during the duration of the project. The Documenting Hope Project was born of one simple gutsy observation: In spite of what most parents are told, many of these children can get better. We have the tools. And by demonstrating how they get better and how to protect their health we have the opportunity to create a better, safer, healthier and more sustainable future . . . for all of us. Our “big idea” is to create a successful, grassroots, crowd-sourced model for improved health outcomes for children affected by chronic…

Teacher Says: Help Kids Become Food Allergy Detectives

By Evelyn Porreca Vuko Science teachers and parents can turn kids from elementary to high school age into food allergy detectives.  Teach them to investigate their own bodies and to determine whether they have food allergies that affect their behavior and learning. Stage 1: Do a Little Homework. Many experts believe that nutrition and food play an important role in the behavior of children diagnosed with attention deficits, learning disabilities and pervasive developmental disorders.  Use Dr. William Crook’s book, Help for the Hyperactive Child: A Practical Guide Offering Parents of ADHD Children Alternatives to Ritalin.  Its workbook format is easy to read. Stage 2: Investigate Behavioral & Learning Symptoms. Personal investigation will help students learn more about themselves, their dietary choices and their behavior.  Use this checklist from Stanley Turecki’s book, The Difficult Child. Kids can decide on “yes,” “no,” or “sometimes.” Are you active and don’t like sitting still? Are you easily distracted while working? Do you dislike new…

Using a Multidisciplinary Approach for Autism and Other Spectrum Disorders

by Patricia S. Lemer, M.Ed., NCC, Chairman of the Board, Epidemic Answers Recently I returned to Boston for my 30th college reunion.  I was disappointed to find that some of my old haunts had vanished, but thrilled to find that others were still there. A visit to what was once Kennedy Hospital for Children, where I began my first job in 1969 as a staff psychologist, resulted in my reminiscing about my career odyssey. It was here that the dream that was to become Developmental Delay Resources, my former non-profit, began to percolate.  This remarkable institution was the genesis of my focus on the concept of a multi-disciplinary team.  How fortunate I  was to have worked with the best doctors and therapists. Every Monday a group of five children entered the hospital as inpatients. Each department did a comprehensive evaluation and on Friday met to discuss findings.  An overall treatment plan included such innovative techniques as a ketogenic nutrition diet,…

Hippotherapy: Therapeutic Horseback Riding

By Donna M Warfield, Co-Executive DirectorCircle of Hope Therapeutic Riding, www.chtr.org Equine assisted therapeutic (hippotherapy) riding provides therapy to children and adults with disabilities including, but not limited to attention deficit disorder, learning disabilities, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, Down syndrome and head trauma. Therapeutic riding is a special training program in which individuals with disabilities learn horse-riding skills. Medical doctors, physical therapists, educators, psychotherapists. and other professionals have come to recognize the numerous physical, psychological, and social benefits of riding therapy. Physical benefits can include improved balance, strength, coordination, and endurance.  Especially for the physically handicapped, the warmth and movement of the horse stimulates unused muscles. Individuals with emotional and developmental disabilities benefit in language development (there are stories of children who spoke their first words ever on horseback) and concentration.  In many children and adults, riding therapy can boost confidence and self-esteem and foster greater independence. Because learning riding skills provides multi-task learning, there can…

Sleep Strategies for Autism, ADHD, SPD and Other Developmental Delays

by Kelly Dorfman, MS, LND, Co-founder Developmental Delay Resources Sleep disturbances are common in children with developmental and attentional issues because they have trouble recognizing their body’s need for rest, so here are sleep strategies for autism, ADHD, SPD and other developmental delays. Feeling sleepiness apart from all the other incoming information is as difficult as other sensory integration tasks, such as paying attention in a crowded classroom or getting to the bathroom in time. Poor sleep regulation is simply another symptom of the sensory system getting confused and overloaded. Adults with sleep problems are instructed to get more exercise, avoid stimulants and have a regular bedtime.  The same advice works well for youngsters with regulation issues. Providing motor and sensory stimulation during the day in the form of exercise or occupational therapy techniques like brushing, prevents the need to seek out excitement at three o’clock in the morning.   One way the body communicates its unmet needs is by restlessness or…

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects

Tommy’s Story – by Liane Holder All seemed well as we began our life with our newly adopted son.  His birth mother’s questionable background was not a concern because surely we could provide all the love and security and parenting necessary to overcome any rocky start he might have. Initially that would appear true as he met physical milestones. His first word was dog and that remained his only word well past his 2nd birthday.  He didn’t sleep through the night and was often irritable, but so were other children… still… something was beginning to nag at us.  Entering daycare at 2, he was a handful, often biting or striking other children without provocation. He also hugged and kissed everybody and anybody, including perfect strangers in stores.  At 3 he entered a language-based special pre-K due to his delayed language.  We didn’t really understand at the time that his lack of speech was the red flag he had been waving…

Patient-Centered Therapy and Integrated Medicine: Dr. Leo Galland

by Patricia S. Lemer, Chairman of the Board, Epidemic Answers Once every few years a book comes along that is destined to become an instant classic. The Four Pillars of Healing by Dr. Leo Galland is such a book. Even before its publication, I was impressed by Dr. Galland who combines common sense with medical science. His previous book, Superimmunity for Kids, has been a best seller for several years. After I heard him speak recently in New Jersey at “Keeping Our Kids Healthy…Naturally,” I felt as if I had known him all my life. Since I am a “diagnostician,” trained in labeling children’s learning problems, I was validated by his approach. Dr. Galland is a Harvard-trained physician with impeccable medical credentials that take five pages to enumerate. What makes him stand out is his insistence on putting the patient back into the healing process. As he details the history of medicine in the first chapters of his new book,…

Interactive Metronome

The Interactive Metronome

Interactive Metronome

What Is the Interactive Metronome? The Interactive Metronome (IM) is a valuable educational tool for children with dyspraxia, language delays, attention deficits, learning, cognitive, sensory integration and motor challenges. Invented by a former rock musician, it was initially used to improve natural timing for musicians and athletes.  Interactive Metronome, the company, was founded for the purpose of developing, researching and delivering the IM to children with special needs. IM equipment consists of a computerized metronome, headsets, foot pads and hand buttons. Trainees are instructed to make smooth, controlled hand and foot motions in a continually repeating pattern, without stopping between beats.  They must focus only on the metronome beat and not be interrupted by their own thoughts or things happening around them. Attention, learning and problem-solving all depend on the capacity to plan and sequence actions and ideas.  This capacity relates directly to a child’s ability to follow directions, read, write, do math and, most importantly, think.  We have not…

How Homeovitics Can Help: A Mother’s Testimonial

Homeovitics has helped recover my son from Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD), a form of autism. Before our recovery story began, I worked as an executive in a chemical company for 10 years. Although I did my best to avoid exposure to chemicals and heavy metal while pregnant, I didn’t know that the chronic, low-level exposures over the years may have accumulated toxins in my body. A Diagnosis of PDD These “hand-me-down” toxins were then passed along to my child in utero – ultimately compromising his immune system. Shortly after our son was born, this seemingly healthy baby was becoming more and more fussy. At about one year, he had stopped responding to his name and wasn’t babbling anymore.  High fevers, gastrointestinal problems, night terrors and ear infections soon followed. At 2 1/2, he was diagnosed as having Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD). We began investigating the effects that toxins (xenobiotics) may have on developing fetuses. We read in Our Stolen Future…

Auditory Training

This article was adapted from brochures available from the IDEA Training Center & the Spectrum Center www.spectrumcenter.com, two excellent sources of auditory training. Who Needs It? Many children with developmental delays initially present as having poor or non-existent speech and language skills. Their medical histories show frequent ear infections, no hand dominance, sound sensitivity, and avoidance of certain types of touch and movement. Candidates for auditory integration training include individuals with learning and language disorders, attention deficits, pervasive developmental disorders, autism, central auditory processing problems and sound sensitivity. Under-reactivity is also seen with some children craving sensory input such as spinning and “rough­housing.”   Behaviors in these individuals are unpredictable; parents, teachers and friends are overwhelmed by poor toler­ance for frustration, temper tantrums, shyness, or aggression that appears unprovoked.   These are all secondary signs of one possible cause which is neuro-physiological. What Is It? The ear has a function that is even more primary that hearing; listening.  Listening requires the coordination…