Increasing Interaction with Children with Multisystem Developmental Disorder

by Serena Wieder, PhD, Co-Author with Stanley Greenspan, MD, of The Child With Special Needs The first important goal in treating children with MultiSystem Developmental Disorder (MSDD) is developing spontaneous interactive behaviors that are purposeful and intentional. Described below are examples of methods that increase affect and help children relate to and communicate with others. These efforts require daily practice and can be incorporated into play sessions, FloorTime or other times when a caregiver devotes total attention to the child. The methods are part of the DIR (Developmental, Individual Differences, Relationship) model providing comprehensive approaches. Follow the leader. Do what the child does. Mutual attention develops through interaction. Never interrupt ongoing interactive play. Treat whatever the child is doing as intentional and purposeful. Your child may not know hot to initiate purposeful behaviors. By giving every move your utmost attention, interest and energy, you will convey that actions are meaningful- and will get a response. Extend the child’s desire and…

Light Sensitivity and Autism, ADHD, SPD and Developmental Delays

by Robin Mumford While the causes of developmental delays are very complex and require intervention on many fronts, simply changing the lighting can be a beneficial addition to other forms of treatment.  Many children are excessively sensitive to the quality of the lighting and may overreact. Light sensitivity and autism, ADHD, SPD and developmental delays is common. This hypersensitivity is complicated by visual stress-­producing factors that overload their visual environment and confuse their eyes and brains.  To create this effect, you need not flash strobe lights.  You need only combine mobiles hanging from the ceiling with busy bulletin boards and over-crowded cubbies. Usually children are quite unaware of the origin of their discomfort.  Added to environmental stress are symptoms of below-par visual skills that many of these children have: Rapid fatigue, while reading or looking at a picture book. Tendency to lose the place on the page Tendency to read too quickly, with poor pronunciation and little recall of what…

Special Needs Parents

By Donna Wendelburg & Kathy Nurek.  Collaboration With Special Needs Parents Children will more easily reach their full potential if the adults around them are working as a team. Use the following suggestions to increase your team’s effectiveness and build good relations with special needs parents. Tell Parents What They Do Well. “I like the way you smile at your child” may be the only compliment you can think of, but it will go a long way to building an effective team of professionals and parents.  Parents need to know what they’re doing right; they often need reassurance and emotional support.  Having a child with a disability makes parenting a daunting task. Learn to Understand Normal Child Development, including Vision and Auditory Development.  Professionals need to understand normal child development or they can’t look for the causes that allow a child to fail. Emphasize a developmental approach rather than a remedial (repetition) approach.  For example, phonics will work – if…