Symptoms Become Worse After Changing Diet

by Kelly Dorfman, MS, LND Improving the diet and adding nutritional supplements are important foundations of effective therapy programs.  Yet some parents find that when they modify their children’s food, symptoms become worse after changing diet. When children become cranky, less related or more hyperactive, it is tempting to see dietary intervention as a failure. The surprising truth is that youngsters who react the most negatively to dietary modifications and supplements can ultimately be the most dramatic positive responders. No response at all is the worst scenario. A change in symptoms indicates that the system is responsive to biochemical shifts.  The key is to understand the hidden message in unwanted symptoms and to make adjustments. Symptoms Worse After Eliminating Dairy OBSERVATION:  Sarah gets diarrhea or a cold after eliminating dairy foods. WHY?  Consuming dairy products may have masked her poor digestion of gluten-based foods. Dairy-based foods tend to be binding.  Eliminating the binder revealed underlying irritation. A sudden illness, such…

“The Diet” (Gluten-Free Casein-Free Diet)

by Patricia S. Lemer, M.S. Bus., NCC Are you on “the diet”? is a query commonly heard wherever I go. At my weight loss clinic “the diet” is the protein shake that allowed me to drop 25 pounds. At the health club, “the diet” could mean The Zone, Atkins or Eat Right for your Type. Friends have used these programs to drop poundage and feel better. Most people have heard of the Feingold diet, a program that eliminates artificial colors flavors, preservatives and salicylates. It has helped many children overcome difficult behaviors. In disability circles, however, the that probably works best is a gluten-free, casein-free diet. I find it one of the simplest, most exciting discoveries in my 40 years in this field. History of the Gluten-Free Casein-Free Diet Originally, Lisa Lewis dug into diet literature looking for a way to help her son. She located the research of Paul Shattock and Karl Reichelt, who link gluten and casein with…

Educational Alternatives

by Patricia S. Lemer, Ms.Bus., NCC, Chairman of the Board, Epidemic Answers Imagine — a ten year old boy attending his fifth school in six years!  His mother consulted me last spring, hopeful that I knew about a special place where her son with Asperger’s syndrome would thrive, not just be tolerated. Unfortunately, there is no such place, I told her.  She described a wish to start a new school for her son and others like him.  She wanted a challenging cognitive curriculum, an art room, computers, hands-on science, and other experiential activities that respected her son’s sensory needs to touch and move, and his interest in technology. Today, he and a peer work together in a close-to-ideal classroom. Although many other families expressed interest in such a project and came to preliminary meetings, they all made other arrangements for fall. Some returned to public schools, determined to fight harder for their children’s rights.  A few found places in forgiving…

Food as Medicine

This piece on food as medicine is excerpted from Annemarie Colbin’s book “Food and Healing”. She is a Certified Health Education Specialist, Founder of Natural Gourmet Cookery School and Institute for Food and Health in New York City. We think of food as something that nourishes and keeps us alive. But food can also heal our bodies (think of it as food as medicine). Every culture has its own remedies for various problems, handed down through the generations. Many childhood ailments respond very well to these traditional preparations. Fevers For thousands of years, an elevation in body temperature was considered beneficial. But for the past 80 years or so, pharmacological medicine has insisted — wrongly — that fever is no good and must be lowered as soon as it appears. If a spontaneous fever does not exceed 104 degrees and is not accompanied by other symptoms, try these natural ways to handle it and speed its passing: Keep the child…

Fat and Brain Development

by Kelly Dorfman, MS, LND, co-founder, Developmental Delay Resources Fat and brain development: A diet high in hydrogenated fats (trans fats) leads to neurological development problems. One of the most dramatic changes in the western diet over the last 50 years has been a shift in the type of fat we consume. Few people understand the serious risk posed by shelf-stable or hydrogenated oils.  These relatively new fats were introduced as part of the war effort over a half century ago. With the butter shortage, these chemically stabilized oils were used widely at home and by food manufacturers who loved their cheap cost and total resistance to spoilage. What started as a food manufacturer’s dream has turned into a brain development nightmare for the last three generations brought up on fats that make a nice cookie but were never meant to be part of brain tissue.  The brain is 60% fat. Myelin, the fatty coating of the neurons or brain…