IgG Allergies in Autism, ADHD, Asthma, Autoimmune and More

by Kelly Dorfman, MS, LN   Intolerance to certain foods, especially gluten (wheat related grains) and casein (milk protein), is a common occurrence among children with developmental delays. Before adopting an elimination diet, however, many parents consult an allergist to determine if the diet is necessary. Surprisingly, after extensive scratch testing, the child is often found not to be allergic to any foods. Some parents choose to eliminate gluten and casein proteins anyway, and find their youngster responds with improved attention, sleep and/or language skills. How is this improvement possible if the child was not allergic in the first place? The answer lies in understanding the difference between allergies and other types of chemical reactions within the body. IgE versus IgG Reactions Allergies are defined as specific reactions within the immune system involving an antibody called immunoglobulin E (IgE). Immediate responses such as hives, congestion or swelling typically result from IgE activity. Traditional scratch testing identifies IgE triggers such as…

Teacher Says: Help Kids Become Food Allergy Detectives

By Evelyn Porreca Vuko Science teachers and parents can turn kids from elementary to high school age into food allergy detectives.  Teach them to investigate their own bodies and to determine whether they have food allergies that affect their behavior and learning. Stage 1: Do a Little Homework. Many experts believe that nutrition and food play an important role in the behavior of children diagnosed with attention deficits, learning disabilities and pervasive developmental disorders.  Use Dr. William Crook’s book, Help for the Hyperactive Child: A Practical Guide Offering Parents of ADHD Children Alternatives to Ritalin.  Its workbook format is easy to read. Stage 2: Investigate Behavioral & Learning Symptoms. Personal investigation will help students learn more about themselves, their dietary choices and their behavior.  Use this checklist from Stanley Turecki’s book, The Difficult Child. Kids can decide on “yes,” “no,” or “sometimes.” Are you active and don’t like sitting still? Are you easily distracted while working? Do you dislike new…