Improving Cognitive Function Through Supplementation

by Kelly Dorfman, MS, LND Convincing evidence shows that certain substances can improve specific aspects of thinking. Here are three promising supplements to consider for anyone interested in improving cognitive function. DMAE (Dimethylaminoethanol):  DMAE is a relative of the nutrient choline.  But, unlike choline, DMAE readily crosses the brain-blood barrier.  It thus directly increases the generation of acetylcholine, an important neurotransmitter. Choline (and DMAE?) is (are?) found in eggs, fish and soybeans. Acetylcholine is abundant in both the cerebral cortex and the cerebellum, and is thus involved in cognitive processes controlled by these parts of the brain, such as memory, problem solving, organization, rational thinking, balance and movement.  Children with motor issues and low arousal may benefit from an increase in acetylcholine availability. Indications: Best for children whose prevailing problems are spaciness and poor organizational skills. Precautions: Avoid in children who have high muscle tension, sleep disturbances or agitation rather than distractibility. DMAE can increase muscle tension levels.  As with…

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effects

Tommy’s Story – by Liane Holder All seemed well as we began our life with our newly adopted son.  His birth mother’s questionable background was not a concern because surely we could provide all the love and security and parenting necessary to overcome any rocky start he might have. Initially that would appear true as he met physical milestones. His first word was dog and that remained his only word well past his 2nd birthday.  He didn’t sleep through the night and was often irritable, but so were other children… still… something was beginning to nag at us.  Entering daycare at 2, he was a handful, often biting or striking other children without provocation. He also hugged and kissed everybody and anybody, including perfect strangers in stores.  At 3 he entered a language-based special pre-K due to his delayed language.  We didn’t really understand at the time that his lack of speech was the red flag he had been waving…

Preconception: Reflections from an Autism Mom

Preconception: Reflections from an Autism Mom

Preconception: Reflections from an Autism Mom

Jennifer Elrod, mother of a toddler boy who is in the process of recovering from mild autistic symptoms, speech delay and gross motor delay, tells us about the importance of preconception in this blog post. As the mother of a toddler who has developmental delays, symptoms of autism, and signs of mitochondrial dysfunction, when I look back at the year before I became pregnant, I have a list of “I wish I had dones” and “I wish I had knowns”. Many of the items on those lists can probably be dismissed. But even after weeding out the less rational fears and doubts, a few things remain. These remaining items can be dismissed on the basis of “don’t feel guilty” or “move forward”. But they can’t be dismissed on logical grounds as opposed to psychological grounds. My goal in looking back is to help somebody else. I have seen the women in the online forums asking other women what they wish…