Vitamin A Autism Treatment Spurs Breakthrough for Child

by Alberta Lindsey, Richmond Times-Dispatch Staff Writer Until he was about one year old, Wesley Sykes had a bright smile and was a lively, robust child. Then his parents, Seth and Lisa Sykes, noticed he wasn’t picking up words as other children were, and the wordlike sounds he had been making stopped. His smile disappeared. At 18 months, he stopped responding to his name. At 21/2, Wesley was diagnosed with autism. Wesley would sit on the floor and spin plates. He would dangle a string in front of his face. He would go into the middle of a room and just spin. He would sit for hours sifting sand or dirt through his fingers, without building anything. “This is a horrific illness,” Mrs. Sykes said. Vitamin A for Autism In October, Wesley began taking natural vitamin A in a study conducted by Dr. Mary N. Megson, a developmental pediatrician and assistant professor of pediatrics at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Medical College of…

Sensory Processing Disorder Early Intervention

by Carol S. Kranowitz, MA Every day, Sensory Processing Disorder receives new recognition as a common problem among children.  Recognition is good, but those of us who know about it and see the benefits of a healthy sensory diet want more.  To prevent sensory integration dysfunction from hindering our children’s development, we want Sensory Processing Disorder early intervention and identification. One way to encourage parents, teachers, and other early childhood professionals to address SI dysfunction is to help them see it as a developmental problem.  Kids don’t grow out of Sensory Processing Disorder; they grow into it, unless we spot it and treat it — the sooner, the better. Early identification is often possible if children attend a center with an occupational therapist (OT) or a savvy teacher on staff, who can observe their behavior over time. Sensory Processing Disorder can also be detected by a pediatric team using a multidisciplinary approach.  Another avenue is a screening.  A screening is…

The Vestibular System and Auditory Language Processing

By Carol Stock Kranowitz, M.A.  Excerpted from The Out-of-Sync Child: Understanding and Coping With Sensory Integration Dysfunction The vestibular system and auditory language processing: Children with vestibular dysfunction may also have auditory language processing problems. As they research their child’s disability, many parents learn about sensory integration and the importance of the body’s vestibular system, perhaps the most basic of all the sensory systems. Initially they learn that the vestibular system coordinates body movements, maintains balance and equilibrium, and helps children develop normal muscle tone. It is not as immediately apparent, though, how the vestibular system influences auditory language processing.  However, the vestibular system plays a significant role in the development of language, so that children with vestibular dysfunction may also have auditory language processing problems. It’s important to realize that the vestibular and auditory systems work together as they process sensations of movement and sound.  These sensations are closely intertwined, because they both begin to be processed in the receptors…