Writing Skills and Autism, ADHD and Other Developmental Delays

Here’s help about writing skills and autism, ADHD and other developmental delays. Given the right environment, handwriting can be fun. You may be familiar already with the Handwriting Without Tears kits, available from Therapro <www.therapyproducts.com> or 1-800-257-5376. Let’s look at four other programs designed to help children who strive to write legibly. 1) Callirobics (from CALLIgraphy and aeROBICS) is a series of simple exercises set to music. This self-guided, creative approach, devised by handwriting expert Liora Laufer, is for home or school use. The multisensory exercises improve: eye-hand coordination fine-motor skills self-esteem and work habits Many children succeed with Callirobics because the activities are brief (one to three minutes apiece), and the task of tracing abstract shapes is easily grasped. Exercises are set to appealing music such as “Danny Boy” and “London Bridge,” as well as to original melodies. Each program comes with a workbook and audiocassette. Two levels of Callirobics are available: Pre-Writing Skills with Music (ages 4-7), and…

Motor Development and Learning

Motor Development and Learning

Motor Development and Learning

by Sheri Present, OTR Motor development and learning:  Motor skills lay the foundation for all aspects of language development, attention, academic achievement and behavior. Before children can relate to concrete objects in the world, or understand how things relate to each other, they must first know where their bodies end and the rest of the world begins. The crawling stage is extremely important for developing muscles in the arms and hands, which later are necessary for fine motor skills such as writing. When infants begin to become mobile, and start to explore, they learn to judge distance, size and shape of objects. When infants move their arms and accidentally hit a rattle, they are functioning simply in a motor stage. However, this random act sets in motion a series of events that arouse the visual and auditory senses. The babies hear the noise, turn their heads and attend visually to the rattle. As they become aware of the relationship between…

The Tomatis Method: All Listening Is Not The Same

By Valerie Dejean, OTR, Director of the Spectrum Center Many listening therapies are available, and almost universally they claim that they are derived or based on the theories of the French physician, ear, nose and throat specialist, Dr. Alfred Tomatis. The Tomatis Method is based on a developmental model of how we all learned to listen – a process that started in the womb.  At the Spectrum Center in Bethesda, MD, we have been employing the Tomatis Method for the past thirteen years. We are often asked what differentiates the Tomatis Method from other methods. Here, I’ll highlight what makes Tomatis unique. Theoretical Bases Tomatis believed that the ear is much more than an organ of hearing.  It energizes and regulates alertness and attention, coordinates posture and movement and connects intentions and thoughts. Furthermore, he discovered that good listeners tune into the high frequency sounds that carry consonants and the meaning of language, while inhibiting the low frequency sounds which…