The Importance of the Microbiome

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We interviewed Raphael Kellman MD about the importance of the microbiome, which is the key to overall mental and physical health. The microbiome is a miniature ecosystem in the gastrointestinal tract, one populated by trillions of microscopic, non-human organisms. These tiny dwellers digest our food, control our appetite, and regulate our metabolism. These bacteria also orchestrate our immune system, influence our mood, and help determine the expression of our genes.

This inner ecology plays a key role in our health because it can affect multiple systems simultaneously. Healing the microbiome can make many positive changes in your child, such as:

Listen in to find out what can throw the microbiome out of balance and how to bring it back to balance.

Please note that you will be asked to enter your email address at the 30-minute mark to finish viewing the video.

About Raphael Kellman MD

Raphael Kellman MDRaphael Kellman MD is a functional medicine internist and author of The Microbiome Diet: The Scientifically Proven Way to Restore Your Gut Health and Achieve Permanent Weight Loss.

A graduate of Albert Einstein School of Medicine, he has, over the past two decades, treated more than 40,000 patients, developing a global reputation for investigating the root causes of disease and pioneering the use of functional and microbiome medicine.

Dr. Kellman draws on the latest research to address patients’ biochemistry, metabolism, hormones, genetics, environment, emotions, and life circumstances to help them achieve optimal health.

In addition to providing patient care and managing a thriving medical practice, Dr. Kellman publishes and lectures all over the world, advocating for whole-patient care and discussing his cutting-edge approach to curing illness through healing the microbiome.

Dr. Kellman lives with his wife and two young daughters—his greatest inspiration for revolutionizing healthcare—in New York City. You can find out more about him and his practice at www.kellmancenter.com

Disclaimer

This webinar is not a substitute for medical advice, treatment, diagnosis, or consultation with a medical professional. It is intended for general informational purposes only and should not be relied on to make determinations related to treatment of a medical condition. Epidemic Answers has not verified and does not guaranty the accuracy of the information provided in this webinar.

Sources & References

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Ganal-Vonarburg, S.C., et al. Microbial-host molecular exchange and its functional consequences in early mammalian life. Science. 2020 May 8;368(6491):604-607.

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Resources

Galland, Leo. The Effect of Intestinal Microbes on Systemic Immunity. Excerpted from Power Healing. Random House, 1998.

Kellman, Raphael. The Microbiome Diet: The Scientifically Proven Way to Restore Your Gut Health and Achieve Permanent Weight Loss. Da Capo Lifelong Books, 2015.

Sachs, Jessica Snyder. Good Germs, Bad Germs: Health and Survival in a Bacterial World. Hill and Wang, 2007.

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