Nourishing Hope for Autism, ADHD, Asperger’s and Allergies

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We interviewed Julie Matthews, Certified Nutrition Consultant, about nourishing hope for autism, ADHD, Asperger’s and allergies.


Julie is well known for her work with bioindividual nutrition, which customizes the diet based on an individual’s needs. We discussed the following topics:

  • Is there research about the benefits of diet and supplementation for children with neurodevelopmental disorders?
  • What are some of the pitfalls you see when people implement diet?
  • Is there one diet that is best?
  • What are some of your favorite diets to understand and consider?
  • Where are some good places to start with diet?
  • Support for picky eaters

Please note that you will be asked to enter your email address at the 30-minute mark to finish viewing the video.

About Julie Matthews CNC

Julie Matthews is a Certified Nutrition Consultant and Education, globally respected nutrition expert, published researcher, accomplished author, and inspirational educator.

Her guidance is backed by sixteen years of clinical experience and scientific research with complex neurological and physiological needs; particularly autism and related disorders.

She has lectured in more than 60 cities across three continents, been on television, radio, newspaper, blogs/podcasts and more, and published scientifically referenced articles in journals and websites.

Julie has been featured by Price-Pottenger, honored by the National Association of Nutrition Professionals, sits on two scientific advisory boards including the Autism Nutrition Research Center, and is contributing author on a breakthrough scientific research study into diet and nutrition to improve autism published in 2018.

She founded Nourishing Hope in 2005 to stand for the efficacy of improved diet and nutrition for autism, and the BioIndividual Nutrition Institute in 2014 to share the synthesis of her knowledge with cutting edge clinicians to help improve their effectiveness with therapeutic diets.

She published Nourishing Hope for Autism: Nutrition and Diet Guide for Healing Our Children in 2008. You can find out more about her work at her websites nourishinghope.combioindividualnutrition.com and nutritionforpregnancy.com.

Disclaimer

This webinar is not a substitute for medical advice, treatment, diagnosis, or consultation with a medical professional. It is intended for general informational purposes only and should not be relied on to make determinations related to treatment of a medical condition. Epidemic Answers has not verified and does not guaranty the accuracy of the information provided in this webinar.

Sources & References

Adams, J.B., et al. Comprehensive Nutritional and Dietary Intervention for Autism Spectrum Disorder-A Randomized, Controlled 12-Month Trial. Nutrients. 2018 Mar 17;10(3).

Adams, J.B., et al. Effect of a vitamin/mineral supplement on children and adults with autism. BMC Pediatr. 2011;11:111.

Adams, J.B., et al. Nutritional and metabolic status of children with autism vs. neurotypical children, and the association with autism severityNutr Metab (Lond) 2011 Jun 8;8(1):34.

Brown, et al. Observable essential fatty acid deficiency markers and autism spectrum disorder. Breastfeed Rev. 2014;22(2):21-6.

Cortese, S., et al. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, iron deficiency, and obesity: is there a link? Postgrad Med. 2014;126(4):155-70. 

Darling, A.L., et al. Association between maternal vitamin D status in pregnancy and neurodevelopmental outcomes in childhood: results from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Br J Nutr 2017 Jun;117(12):1682-1692.

El-Ansary, A., et al. Lipid mediators in plasma of autism spectrum disorders. Lipids Health Dis. 2012;11:160.

Ghanizadeh, A. Increased glutamate and homocysteine and decreased glutamine levels in autism: a review and strategies for future studies of amino acids in autism. Dis Markers. 2013;35(5):281-6.

Li, S.O., et al. Serum copper and zinc levels in individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Neuroreport. 2014;25(15):1216-20.

Mahmoud, M.M., et al. Zinc, ferritin, magnesium and copper in a group of Egyptian children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Ital J Pediatr. 2011;37:60.

Millichap, J.G., et al. The diet factor in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Pediatrics. 2012 Feb;129(2):330-7.

Mossin, M.H., et al. Inverse associations between cord vitamin D and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms: A child cohort study. Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2017 Jul;51(7):703-710.

Pastural, E., et al. Novel plasma phospholipid biomarkers of autismmitochondrial dysfunction as a putative causative mechanism. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2009 Oct;81(4):253-64.

Patrick, R.P., et al. Vitamin D hormone regulates serotonin synthesis. Part 1: relevance for autism. FASEB J. 2014;28(6):2398-413.

Reynolds, A., et al. Iron status in children with autism spectrum disorder. Pediatrics. 2012;130 Suppl 2:S154-9.

Sucksdorff, M., et al. Maternal Vitamin D Levels and the Risk of Offspring Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019 Dec 18.

Verlaet, A.A., et al. Nutrition, immunological mechanisms and dietary immunomodulation in ADHDEur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014;23(7):519-29.

Vuillermot, S., et al. Vitamin D treatment during pregnancy prevents autism-related phenotypes in a mouse model of maternal immune activation. Mol Autism. 2017 Mar 7;8:9.

Wu, D.M., et al. Relationship Between Neonatal Vitamin D at Birth and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders: the NBSIB Study. J Bone Miner Res. 2018 Mar;33(3):458-466.

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