The Autism Exchange

The Autism Exchange

The Autism Exchange

The Autism Exchange (AEX) is a fast, user-friendly website that takes frustration out of internet searches. Their mission is to connect autism parents with the information, products, and services they need to support their child to the fullest, without wasting valuable time searching the internet. Their slogan is “Sharing Info Saving Time”.  They provide the capability for everyone to share information, which in turn helps all parents save time. The AEX is designed to put autism-related information at your fingertips. Their unique custom software organizes, standardizes, and randomly displays all AEX information which makes it easy to search and saves you lots of time. They have well over a 1,000 data streams, with 2,000 more on the way.  In addition, they have very useful interactive tools. At the Autism Exchange, Users Can: Use the interactive tools to search common autism categories, directory lists, consumer corner products, and community library articles. Share information that you have with other parents through the…

Our Favorite Recovery Books

Our Favorite Recovery Books

Our Favorite Recovery Books

You can purchase items from Amazon Smile and designate us as your beneficiary – we’ll get 0.5% of all purchases.  We’d love to be your charity of choice!  If you feel inspired to give outright, you can make a tax-deductible donation here. To make it easy for you, we thought we’d share our favorite books about health and healing: “Is This Your Child:  Discovering and Treating Unrecognized Allergies in Children and Adults” by Doris Rapp, M.D. “Healing the New Childhood Epidemics: Autism, ADHD, Asthma and Allergies: The Groundbreaking Program for the 4-A Disorders” by Kenneth Bock and Cameron Strauth “A Compromised Generation: The Epidemic of Chronic Illness in America’s Children” by Beth Lambert and Victoria Kobliner “Outsmarting Autism:  The Ultimate Guide to Management, Healing and Prevention” by Patricia S. Lemer “Almost Autism:  Recovering Children from Sensory Processing Disorder, A Reference for Parents and Practitioners” by Maria Rickert Hong, CHHC, AADP “Envisioning a Bright Future:  Interventions That Work for Children and Adults…

Toys for Children with Special Needs

by Cheri Riehle When choosing toys for children with special needs, keep in mind that specially designed or modified toys are not always necessary.  For all children, toys are only props used in play, and the process of play itself is valuable for development of physical, cognitive, social and emotional skills. Too many toys can be overwhelming to any child.  Think back to your childhood days, when cardboard boxes became doll furniture or tunnels for cars.  There are many wonderful toys on the market; let your child use his or her imagination and creativity to develop ways of expanding play. Consider purchasing toys that are open-ended and allow play to be taken in different directions.  Dolls, car sets and art supplies are good examples of open-ended toys. Organize your child’s play area.   Divide toys into boxes or bins and continually exchange bins, rather than keep all toys out at once. Toys that have been put away for a while, seem…