Special Needs Summer Camps or ESY?

Special Needs Summer Camps or ESY?

Special Needs Summer Camps or ESY?

Patricia S. Lemer, M.S.Bus., NCC, Chairman of the Board, Epidemic Answers, fills us in on special needs summer camps. Parents frequently ask me to make recommendations about summer programming for their children with special needs. They are torn between using the season for intensifying therapy programs or giving the child a break from routine. Any child who has an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) is eligible for an Extended School Year (ESY) program. ­ First, “critical life skills” are identified in the IEP. Next, a committee determines if the child’s critical life skills, without ESY services: Will regress and not be recovered in a reasonable amount of time Are emerging and at a breakthrough point Are impeded by stereotypic, ritualistic or self-injurious behaviors If an interruption in programming is likely to prevent a student from receiving some benefit from the educational program during the regular school year, the school system must provide ESY services. IEP goals for ESY are carried over…

Special Needs Parents

By Donna Wendelburg & Kathy Nurek.  Collaboration With Special Needs Parents Children will more easily reach their full potential if the adults around them are working as a team. Use the following suggestions to increase your team’s effectiveness and build good relations with special needs parents. Tell Parents What They Do Well. “I like the way you smile at your child” may be the only compliment you can think of, but it will go a long way to building an effective team of professionals and parents.  Parents need to know what they’re doing right; they often need reassurance and emotional support.  Having a child with a disability makes parenting a daunting task. Learn to Understand Normal Child Development, including Vision and Auditory Development.  Professionals need to understand normal child development or they can’t look for the causes that allow a child to fail. Emphasize a developmental approach rather than a remedial (repetition) approach.  For example, phonics will work – if…

Handwriting and Occupational Therapy

What is writing?  Writing is a complex process that requires the integration of touch, proprioception, kinesthesia, vision, motor coordination and language.  This blog is about handwriting and occupational therapy for developmentally delayed children. Every sense must be well-developed and collaborate with each other sense to produce the memory, motor coordination, perception and attention necessary to put thoughts on paper. Writing is one aspect of written language that depends on the interaction of a multitude of developmental skills. Some children move smoothly through the sequential steps necessary to write.  For children with developmental delays, however, writing can be extremely frustrating. Until young bodies are ready, we must not demand paper and pencil results.  To assure success, we must understand how handwriting skills develop. “Write” from the Start – The ability to write starts devel­oping in infancy and evolves into adulthood.  Small muscles of the hands begin to strengthen as babies push themselves up from their tummies.  (The recent recommendation to place…