Navigating the Low-Glutamate REID Diet with Andi Stowe of Nourished Blessings

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We interviewed Andi Stowe of Nourished Blessings about the low-glutamate REID Diet (Reduced Excitatory Inflammatory Diet) developed by Katie Reid PhD of Unblind My Mind. You can watch the replay below:

Have you heard of the low-glutamate REID diet for children with autism, ADHD and seizures? It’s a diet that’s quickly becoming more widely known and for good reason! 

Glutamate is an amino acid that is produced endogenously in the body and also consumed exogenously through foods. It is the most abundant neurotransmitter in our central nervous system, and it is responsible for regulating the receptors of other neurotransmitters. 

Free, unbound glutamate in excess in the body causes excitoxicity, in which brain cells become so excited that they die, potentially causing neurological symptoms seen in conditions such as:

Processed foods generally contain high levels of free glutamate, and the REID diet excludes them, as well as foods and ingredients that contain high levels of free glutamate including:

  • Gluten-containing foods
  • Dairy-containing foods
  • Monosodium glutamate
  • Artificial and natural flavors
  • Any food with “umami” such as soy sauce, coconut aminos and Bragg’s aminos
  • Bouillon
  • Anything containing “glutamate”
  • Anything containing “hydrolyzed”
  • Anything “autolyzed”
  • Any protein “isolate”
  • Whey
  • Protein powders

For a more comprehensive list, please see our page on the low-glutamate diet.

Tune in to watch our previously recorded Instagram Live with Andi Stowe, hosted by Shandy Laskey of Speaking of Health & Wellness and the Social Media Director of Epidemic Answers.

Please note that you will be asked to provide your email address to continue viewing this video at the 30-minute mark.

About Andi Stowe

Andi Stowe is a health and clean eating blogger living in Greenville, SC. She spends her days supporting and educating families to overcome their health struggles by incorporating the cleaner, low-glutamate REID diet. Many of her efforts are centered around the dangers and removal of free glutamate found in many processed foods.

She discovered that her son’s developmental delays and autism symptoms resolved when she removed additives from his diet and worked to balance neurotransmitters. Andi is passionate about bringing awareness to health issues associated with excess glutamate and using food and lifestyle to heal. 

Andi Stowe

You can find out more about her and her work at her website nourishedblessings.com

Disclaimer

This information is not a substitute for medical advice, treatment, diagnosis, or consultation with a medical professional. It is intended for general informational purposes only and should not be relied on to make determinations related to treatment of a medical condition. Epidemic Answers has not verified and does not guaranty the accuracy of the information provided.

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Resources

Adams, Mike. The Truth About Aspartame, MSG and Excitoxins. Truth Publishing, Inc., 2010.

Blaylock MD, Russell. Excitoxins: The Taste That Kills. Health Press, 1996.

Lambert, Beth, et al. Brain Under Attack: A Resource for Parents and Caregivers of Children with PANS, PANDAS and Autoimmune Encephalitis. Answers Publications, 2018.

Ross, Julia. The Mood Cure: The 4-Step Program to Take Charge of Your Emotions–Today. Penguin Life, 2003.

Scott, Trudy. The Antianxiety Food Solution: How the Foods You Eat Can Help You Calm Your Anxious Mind, Improve Your Mood and End Cravings. New Harbinger Publications, 2011.

Websites

Amy Yasko’s list of foods with high free glutamates

Amy Yasko’s list of neuroprovokers

How to Increase GABA and Balance Glutamate: Article by Amy Yasko PhD, ND biochemist

Katie Reid’s pantry list of recommended foods.

MSG: Deadly Menace in Your Food: Article by Russell Blaylock MD, neurosurgeon

MSG Truth

Natural plant products and extracts that reduce immunoexcitotoxicity-associated neurodegeneration and promote repair within the central nervous system: Peer-reviewed article by Russell Blaylock MD, neurosurgeon

Nourished Blessings

Truth in Labeling

Unblind My Mind:  Dr. Reid’s website gives extensive explanation about the science, a TED talk by Dr. Reid and video tutorials to help parent’s discern appropriate foods in a local supermarket

Videos

The Autism Epidemic Is Caused by EMFs, Acting via Calcium Channels and Chemicals Acting via NMDA-Rs

Excitotoxins, Neurotoxins & Human Neurological Disease Lecture by Russell Blaylock MD

Glutamate, Excitoxicity and Autism

Unblind My Mind: What Are We Eating? Dr. Katherine Reid at [email protected]

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