Sensory Integration Dysfunction and Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD)

Sensory Integration Dysfunction and Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD)

Sensory Integration Dysfunction and Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD)

If any sense is inefficient, the integration process can be disrupted, and Sensory Integration Dysfunction (SID) – a term coined by A. Jean Ayres PhD – occurs.  However, because of the possibility of confusing it with the unrelated disorder Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), in the 1980s, those in the field informally began using the term DSI for dysfunction in sensory integration. Ayres Sensory Integration Ayres Sensory Integration® (ASI) is now trademarked, and includes the original theory, assessment, patterns of dysfunction, and intervention concepts, principles, and techniques articulated by Dr. Ayres and applied by therapists trained in this approach worldwide. Some of Dr. Ayres’ colleagues and students, headed by Susanne Smith Roley OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA and Zoe Mailloux, OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA, founded a new organization called The Collaborative for Leadership in Ayres Sensory Integration (CLASI). CLASI provides continuing education opportunities for mastering, applying and advancing knowledge in ASI theory and practice, culminating in a certificate of certification.  CLASI is a…

Preventing Sensory Processing Disorder in High-Risk Infants

Preventing Sensory Processing Disorder in High-Risk Infants

Preventing Sensory Processing Disorder in High-Risk Infants

Kelly Dorfman, MS, LDN, discusses how a good neurological diet and healing the gut may stave off Sensory Processing Disorder in a high-risk infant. Three year old Charlie was recently diagnosed with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD), and his parents were relieved to finally have an explanation for his extreme fussiness, poor sleep, and developmental delays.  What Is Sensory Processing Disorder?  Previously labeled Sensory Integration Dysfunction, Sensory Processing Disorder relates to the commonly known senses of touch (including pressure), taste, smell, vision and sound as well as other senses such as: Proprioceptive sense:  This sense helps a person determine where they are in space in relation to other things and people. Children with Sensory Processing Disorder often feel disconnected from their bodies and thus often have poor coordination, which can often lead to delays in social development. Vestibular sense:  Proprioception is intertwined with the vestibular sense, which is controlled by the movement of fluid within the inner ear. Because the vestibular…

Sensory Processing Disorder

Sensory Processing Disorder

Sensory Processing Disorder

What Is Sensory Processing Disorder? Children with sensory processing disorder issues have great difficulty processing and acting upon information received through their senses. Have you ever seen a child who appears to be “out of sync” with how they interact with their environment? It may be that somehow the sensory signals in the brain are not available or they just don’t get organized enough to respond appropriately. The result is children develop sensory-seeking or sensory-avoiding patterns because their nervous systems do not process the sensory input coming into the brain correctly. Consequently, they manifest over-sensitivity (hyper) and/or under-sensitivity (hypo) reactions or both. There are eight senses involved in a child’s development which are necessary for processing information: Hearing or auditory processing which is connected to language and communication Touch or somatosensory or tactile which is touching the skin Taste (gustatory) Smell (olfactory) having difficulty with food textures and are picky eaters Vision, which is how the brain interprets visual input…

Kyle: Sensory Processing Disorder and ADHD

Where do I begin? Should I start with my being pregnant and working at a stressful job in New York City? Maybe I should first write about my family history of celiac and not knowing that having undiagnosed celiac/gluten intolerance can have major consequences to your unborn child. Maybe I should begin with my son’s delivery. I describe the aftermath as being a crime scene, (sorry for the visual). Let’s just say it was the perfect storm of two injections of an epidural, lots of pitocin and a forceps delivery. The Crying Began As soon as our bundle of joy came home…the crying began. The doctor diagnosed him with having an awful case of colic, the worst she had ever seen. He was prescribed a cocktail of Maalox and Zantac for the first year and a half of his life. No other suggestion was made other than medicine and changing his formula. Throughout all of this I was trying to…

Sensory Processing Disorder Survey

We’re helping out a Masters student with her thesis on children with Sensory Processing Disorder.  She’s put together an anonymous survey, and we’re asking for your help in filling it out.  Her name is Meghan Bookler, and here’s what she says: “Hello! I am the mother of a 6 y.o. with SMD-SOR (Sensory Modulation Disorder) and I am so happy to have found this site. I sure could have used this site those 1st 3 years!  Though I am thrilled to be here now. I also want to post my biography in case you are interested in participating in the anonymous research survey I have posted on this thread.: http://about.me/meghan_brookler I am currently writing my thesis.  It is about SPD and will contribute to (my – and hopefully others!) understanding of the possible microbiome-gut-brain connection in SPD.  I am happy to share any and all info as this has been a long journey for us, and we are doing so…

Pediatric Chiropractic for Autism, ADHD, Sensory Processing Disorder and Developmental Delays

by Warren Bruhl, DC, DICCP “Get knowledge of the spine, for this is the requisite for many diseases.” -Hippocrates, 460-377 BC You might visit a chiropractor for problems as diverse as backache, ear infections, or learning disorders. Regardless of your symptoms, my objective as a chiropractor is always to correct nerve interference, safely and effectively. Another term to describe nerve interference is vertebral subluxation. This is a complex of physiological factors frequently seen in children with developmental delays. The nervous system is sensitive to the movement and position of the spine. Vertebral subluxation can either increase or decrease the rate at which nerve messages travel from brain to body and back again. The result is that the child’s brain cannot communicate with his body. This miscommunication is comparable to what happens when you use a walkie-talkie with the headsets on different channels. What does this complex mean for the child with developmental delays? If he has vertebral subluxation, he will never…

Sensory Processing Disorder and Social Interaction

by Patricia S. Lemer, MS. Bus., NCC, Chairman of the Board, Epidemic Answers This blog post focuses on autism, ADHD, developmental delays and Sensory Processing Disorder and social interaction. The emergence of appropriate social skills is the final step on the path to resolving developmental delays. Almost daily at my office, I welcome parents and their children who come for testing. As they enter, inevitably I hear, “Scott, say hi to Patty.” Scott may act dutifully, repeating the words rotely, without eye contact – or he may be mute. In the first instance, the parent is relieved; at least he talked. In the latter, she may be embarrassed. Appropriate Social Interaction: The Last Frontier Social skills lag behind until the child’s immune system works better, motor skills strengthen, language emerges, reading and mathematics develop, and handwriting becomes legible. When social skills get scant attention, inappropriate or poor interactions are the result. Recognizing that their child has few friends is painful…

Sensory Processing Disorder Early Intervention

by Carol S. Kranowitz, MA Every day, Sensory Processing Disorder receives new recognition as a common problem among children.  Recognition is good, but those of us who know about it and see the benefits of a healthy sensory diet want more.  To prevent sensory integration dysfunction from hindering our children’s development, we want Sensory Processing Disorder early intervention and identification. One way to encourage parents, teachers, and other early childhood professionals to address SI dysfunction is to help them see it as a developmental problem.  Kids don’t grow out of Sensory Processing Disorder; they grow into it, unless we spot it and treat it — the sooner, the better. Early identification is often possible if children attend a center with an occupational therapist (OT) or a savvy teacher on staff, who can observe their behavior over time. Sensory Processing Disorder can also be detected by a pediatric team using a multidisciplinary approach.  Another avenue is a screening.  A screening is…

The “R” Word: Sensory Processing Disorder Recovery

You may or may not know my personal recovery story. I have recovered my 2 sons, now ages 5 and 7, from sensory processing disorder (SPD), asthma, allergies, acid reflux and eczema with a biomedical approach, which means correcting nutritional and hormonal deficiencies, removing toxicities and correcting gut dysbiosis. Most people don’t know that sensory processing disorder recovery is possible, but my sons have recovered from it. I’m still working on failure to thrive, mitochondrial dysfunction, hypothyroidism and persistent eczema in my older son. In addition, they both had developmental delays, and my older son had severe hypotonia as a baby. I have recovered from immune dysregulation, in which I had shingles twice, the worst case of poison-ivy ever, bronchitis (which I’d never had before), constant sinus infections and constant colds that would last 3-4 weeks at a time. My older son had immune dysregulation, too, when he was younger: he would go to preschool, get sick and be out…

Recovery from Sensory Processing Disorder, Reflux, Asthma, Eczema

Maria Rickert Hong‘s Children: Recovered from Sensory Processing Disorder, Acid Reflux, Asthma and Eczema, and getting healthier everyday! Let me tell you about my sons’ recovery from sensory processing disorder, acid reflux, asthma and eczema. I used to wonder a long time ago if these issues were related to each other and to their developmental delays, anxiety, failure to thrive and mitochondrial dysfunction, and now I know that they are. All of these issues are related to gut dysbiosis (in their case, a system Candida infection) and toxicity.  They are both full of heavy metals (mercury, lead, arsenic, cadmium). My older son is at the 97th percentile for heavy-metal toxicity; my younger one at the 90th. They both got it from me when I was pregnant with them.  I didn’t find out until after my older son was over 4 years old that we were all full of heavy metals. My concerns about my sons’ problems were dismissed by all…